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How to fold a coat

Gents, do you know how to fold a suit jacket? As far as aggravating clothing maintenance goes, packing and transporting suits is pretty high on the list.

A good wool jacket combines two major problems when it’s not on your shoulders. First, it’s bulky. Second, it’s vulnerable to permanent creasing if a fold gets pressed into the fabric.

You can steam or iron those out later but that’s extra work and hard on the jacket’s longevity. It’s a problem that cries out for a solution.

Fortunately, we have three for you. Check them out below!

Suit Jacket Fold #1 – Tucked-Shoulder Fold

This one does involve a large fold down the center of the jacket. That means it’s not quite as crease-proof as a good roll.

That said, you often have to fold a jacket to get it into a suitcase — especially when space is very limited — and a flat fold is sometimes the only way to go. This one’s better than most, and reduces the number of folds that aren’t on seams to one.

Basically, you gently work one shoulder inside-out, then tuck the other shoulder into it, seam against seam. The sleeves lie straight down the jacket, one on top of the other, and the breast panels (with their linings turned outward) sandwich the whole thing. Then you fold it in half from the bottom and pack it away.

This one’s good for when you need a flatter fold than a roll and the jacket is going to be stowed for a while. If you’re good about not stacking too much weight on it, the crease down the middle shouldn’t set, and you’ve got the jacket lining protecting the outside of the jacket from any wear or tear.

Its big disadvantage, other than the single fold that can potentially crease, is that it can take a couple tries to get it right, and that you generally need a clean flat surface to do it on. It can be done standing and holding the jacket, but it’s tricky.

Suit Jacket Fold #2 – The Shirt-Style Fold

For the guy on the go, sometimes the easiest way to deal with the jacket is just to quickly fold it over like a dress shirt.

The sleeves tuck behind the back, with the shoulders overlapping slightly at the middle, and the whole thing gets folded in half from the bottom, tucking the bottom hem up underneath the collar. The lapels and collar sit right on top, and you get a pretty neat square shape.

The resulting bundle is about the same size as the one you get in Option #2, but a little thicker in the middle and not quite as even.

The big problem here is that you’re folding the jacket in several places, both vertically and horizontally. That’s a good way to get at least some creases, especially where the folds cross each other.

So why bother mentioning it? It’s a lot quicker to throw together than the other two folds, and it’s easy to do without a flat surface. You just tuck the collar of the jacket under your chin and make three quick folds, and bam, you’re done.

If you know you’re just going to be throwing the jacket on top of a case for a short period, this’ll work just fine. For longer travel, or if it’s going to have weight pressing down on it, you’re better off with one of the other methods.

Suit Jacket Fold #3 – The Jacket Roll

My personal favorite!

To get the least number of folds possible, there’s an easy solution: don’t fold the jacket at all.

You still need to do some creative tucking and layering. But, it is possible to roll the whole jacket up (rather like a sleeping blanket or sleeping pad) into a soft tube of fabric.

The big advantage here is that, properly done, a rolled jacket is never folded across the fabric. Most of the action happens around the shoulders and sleeves, which are made to flex, and the broad front and back panels of the jacket get bent gently into a curve rather than pressed flat into a corner.

You can also usually tuck a shirt or a couple pairs of underwear into the roll, if you’ve got a deep enough suitcase. Just don’t try to cram too much in there — the roll won’t hold as well, and you’ll be more likely to wrinkle your jacket in the process.

The main disadvantage of a roll is that it takes up more space (especially vertical space) than a flat fold. It can sometimes take a few tries to get it right with no wrinkles.

And remember, you need to take those extra tries. If you force the jacket into storage with interior wrinkles, they’re likely to crease.

Transporting a Suit Jacket – Steps You Can Always Take

Whatever method you choose for folding and storing your jackets, there are a couple of ways to minimize the damage:

  • First off, avoid folding the jacket at all. If you’re flying, wear at least one of your jackets onto the plane. This way you don’t have to pack it at all, apart from maybe a couple hours in the overhead.
  • Use a full-length garment bag and keep the jacket on a hanger. These work on airplanes or in cars, but they’re limited in carrying capacity.
  • If you do have to fold, minimize the number of folds needed, and try to keep them along the seams. The less you have to fold across a flat plane of fabric, the better.
  • Where possible, stow the jacket with the lining facing outward, not the surface. If the jacket lining gets scuffed, stained, or torn in transport, it won’t show when you’re wearing it. Whereas, damage on the outside can ruin the jacket, or at least require immediate repair.

It doesn’t do anything about the bulk (we’ll show you some creative folds in a minute that will help with that). But, treating the jacket gently in the first place, no matter what you’re doing, can help it get to its destination crease-free and ready to wear.

Also read:

The Next Step…

Pretty good article, huh?

Well remember, all this information is great but you have to TAKE ACTION!

Click below to watch the video – 3 Ways To Fold A Suit Jacket Without Damage

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About Antonio

I’m Antonio Centeno, the founder of RMRS. I’m a former Marine Corps Officer with a BA in Evolutionary Biology and Philosophy (Cornell College 98′) and an MBA from The University Of Texas at Austin (07′). I studied the Science of Style in London, Hong Kong, and Bangkok and have created over 5000 videos/ articles to help men dress better. Click here to discover more about our mission here at RMRS.

Ready to earn more money and command respect with the right clothing? Want to start dressing sharp today? Click here to discover The Style System , the BEST Professional Style Course on the planet!

How to fold a Suit Jacket
Do you travel a lot for business? Then you need to know how to fold your jacket properly. It’s important you look smart, creased jackets are not the way forward, especially if you’ve invested in buying high quality jackets like ours. You don't want the corozo buttons to come off or the hank pocket to tear, instead you want the shoulder pads to stay in their original shape. So, create the best impression at your next oversees meeting, and read through our guidelines below:

Choose the jacket you want to pack in your luggage. I would say this method is easier when holding the jacket, rather than laying it flat on a hard surface.

The first step is to turn the jacket inside out. Fold the left shoulder back, so that the lining is on the outside. Look at image below for reference.

Turn the right shoulder inside out, then tuck the left shoulder into the right. Folding you jacket this way should avoid you dealing with the awkwardness of the inward-facing shoulder pads. Look at the image below.

Finally fold the jacket in lengthwise and then fold horizontally. This should create a square shape that fits easily in a suitcase. To be extra safe you can always put it inside a plastic bag.

This method is easy, effective and less time-consuming, so if you’re in a rush then this might the perfect option for you.

If you can, avoid folding the jacket at all. You might want to put inside a garment bag if it needs to be transported. You can get yourself a garment bag from any menswear store or purchase one online.

If you do have to fold, minimize the number of folds needed to reduce wrinkles.

Before folding it, you should clean and press it before you travel.

To make sure the folded jacket is placed at the top of all your other clothes in the suitcase.

When it comes to prepping for winter travel, maximizing space is essential. Packing a single pair of boots, a sweater, and a coat can leave you with little room in your luggage. If you’re traveling from an area with warmer weather, wearing your coat on the plane can be a major drag. Luckily, there’s an expert-approved alternative to jamming your favorite outerwear into your suitcase. For those planning an excursion into colder climates, it’s well worth freeing up some space and learning how to pack a winter coat properly. Read on to see how it’s done in six steps.

1. Zip It Up

The first step in packing a winter coat is to zip it all the way up. The same rule applies if your coat has buttons or snaps. Leaving a coat unzipped is likely to make rolling and folding uneven. If you leave your coat unzipped, it might take up far more space than needed.

2. Fold the Sleeves First

Lay your coat flat on its front with the sleeves and hood extended. Then fold each sleeve backward at a natural angle, roughly parallel with the sides of the body of the coat. The sleeves should not overlap.

3. Fold It in Half

Next, fold your coat backward along the midline. You should now have a neatly folded coat. The front of the garment should be facing outward.

4. Roll It Up

Starting from the bottom of the coat, tightly roll the coat upward like you would a sleeping bag. Make sure to keep the edges straight and squeeze any excess air out of the coat as you go. Rolling tightly is essential to effectively packing a winter coat.

5. Band It Up

Using a set of heavy-duty rubber bands (hair bands will also work depending on the size of the coat), bind the rolled portion of the coat securely. Avoid using ultra-thin or flimsy bands, since these can snap in transit.

6. Stow the Coat

The final stage in packing up a winter coat is to place it in your luggage. If you’re using a hard suitcase, opt for a corner or side in order to take up as little space as possible. The same rule applies if you’re packing a duffel, where a coat can nestle along the edge and act as a buffer for more fragile items.

Ready for your next lesson in packing? Read on to discover how to pack without wrinkling your clothes.

As far as clothing maintenance goes, packing and transporting men’s suit and sports jackets is pretty high on the list of aggravating tasks.

A good wool jacket combines two major problems when it’s not on your shoulders: it’s bulky, and it’s vulnerable to permanent creasing if a fold gets pressed into the fabric.

You can steam or iron those out later, in most cases, but it’s still extra work, and hard on the jacket’s longevity.

It’s a problem that cries out for a solution.

Fortunately, we have three for you.

Jacket Fold Style #1 – Tucked-Shoulder Fold

This one does involve a large fold down the center of the jacket, meaning it’s not quite as crease-proof as a good roll.

That said, you often have to fold a jacket to get it into a suitcase — especially when space is very limited — and a flat fold is sometimes the only way to go. This one’s better than most, and reduces the number of folds that aren’t on seams to one.

Basically, you gently work one shoulder inside-out, then tuck the other shoulder into it, seam against seam. The sleeves lie straight down the jacket, one on top of the other, and the breast panels (with their linings turned outward) sandwich the whole thing. Then you fold it in half from the bottom and pack it away.

This one’s good for when you need a flatter fold than a roll and the jacket is going to be stowed for a while. If you’re good about not stacking too much weight on it, the crease down the middle shouldn’t set, and you’ve got the jacket lining protecting the outside of the jacket from any wear or tear.

Its big disadvantage, other than the single fold that can potentially crease, is that it can take a couple tries to get it right, and that you generally need a clean flat surface to do it on. It can be done standing and holding the jacket, but it’s tricky.

Jacket Fold Style #2 – The Shirt-Style Fold

For the guy on the go, sometimes the easiest way to deal with the jacket is just to quickly fold it over like a dress shirt.

The sleeves tuck behind the back, with the shoulders overlapping slightly at the middle, and the whole thing gets folded in half from the bottom, tucking the bottom hem up underneath the collar. The lapels and collar sit right on top, and you get a pretty neat square shape.

The resulting bundle is about the same size as the one you get in Option #2, but a little thicker in the middle and not quite as even.

The big problem here is that you’re folding the jacket in several places, both vertically and horizontally. That’s a good way to get at least some creases, especially where the folds cross each other.

So why bother mentioning it? It’s a lot quicker to throw together than the other two folds, and it’s easy to do without a flat surface. You just tuck the collar of the jacket under your chin and make three quick folds, and bam, you’re done.

If you know you’re just going to be throwing the jacket on top of a case for a short period, this’ll work just fine. For longer travel, or if it’s going to have weight pressing down on it, you’re better off with one of the other methods.

Jacket Fold Style #3 – The Jacket Roll

My personal favorite!

To get the least number of folds possible, there’s an easy solution: don’t fold the jacket at all.

You still need to do some creative tucking and layering, but it is possible to roll the whole jacket up (rather like a sleeping blanket or sleeping pad) into a soft tube of fabric.

The big advantage here is that, properly done, a rolled jacket is never folded across the fabric. Most of the action happens around the shoulders and sleeves, which are made to flex, and the broad front and back panels of the jacket get bent gently into a curve rather than pressed flat into a corner.

You can also usually tuck a shirt or a couple pairs of underwear into the roll, if you’ve got a deep enough suitcase. Just don’t try to cram too much in there — the roll won’t hold as well, and you’ll be more likely to wrinkle your jacket in the process.

The main disadvantage of a roll is that it takes up more space (especially vertical space) than a flat fold, and that it can sometimes take a few tries to get it right with no wrinkles.

And remember, you need to take those extra tries — if you force the jacket into storage with interior wrinkles, they’re likely to crease.

Transporting a Jacket – Steps You Can Always Take

However you fold and store your jackets (more on that in a minute), there are a couple of ways to always minimize the damage to it:

  • First off, avoid folding the jacket at all. If you’re flying, wear at least one of your jackets onto the plane so that you don’t have to pack it at all, apart from maybe a couple hours in the overhead.
  • Whenever possible, use a full-length garment bag and keep the jacket on a hanger.These work on airplanes or in cars, but they’re limited in carrying capacity.
  • If you do have to fold, minimize the number of folds needed, and try to keep them along the seams. The less you have to fold across a flat plane of fabric, the better.
  • Where possible, stow the jacket with the lining facing outward, not the surface. If the lining gets scuffed, stained, or torn in transport, it won’t show when you’re wearing it, whereas damage on the outside can ruin the jacket, or at least require immediate repair.

It doesn’t do anything about the bulk (we’ll show you some creative folds in a minute that will help with that), but treating the jacket gently in the first place, no matter what you’re doing, can help it get to its destination crease-free and ready to wear.

“The Tri-Fold coat’s unique folds are its signature- the elegant lines they create make it a great choice if you’re in search of something a bit more refined than your everyday winter coat. It is constructed of wool, and I’ve added genuine Minelli leather and contrast on the sleeves, which also feature cozy knit cuffs. Our black coat features grey wool on the sleeve hem, our grey coat features black wool on the sleeve hem. Marbled wool (as pictured in the last few photos) or other colors on the sleeve hem by special request only. It features a zip-front closure (gold or silver based on supply availability) and two pockets, located on the side seams. This coat is fully lined and ready to wrap you in style and warmth!

Material: Wool w/ rayon lining
Sleeve: Genuine black Minelli leather and contrasting wool on the sleeve, with signature knit wrist cuffs to keep you extra covered and cozy!

Also available in Limited Edition Grey Alpaca Wool

Purchase any out-of-stock piece on a made-to-order request. All made-to-order pieces will be completed and shipped within two to four weeks of purchase.

Anyone with pre-orders that may not be ready in time for Christmas or any particular gift-giving event may get a PREORDER CARD. It’s complimentary and will have no extra charge. Let somebody know that a special handmade piece is coming their way! Just add a note to your order at checkout if you want to get one!